18.12.10

Sam Harris, on stem cell research.

A three-day-old human embryo is a collection of 150 cells called a blastocyst. There are, for the sake of comparison, more than 100,000 cells in the brain of a fly. If our concern is about suffering in this universe, it is rather obvious that we should be more concerned about killing flies than about killing three-day-old human embryos… Many people will argue that the difference between a fly and a three-day-old human embryo is that a three-day-old human embryo is a potential human being. Every cell in your body, given the right manipulations, every cell with a nucleus is now a potential human being. Every time you scratch your nose, you’ve committed a holocaust of potential human beings… Let’s say we grant it that every three-day-old human embryo has a soul worthy of our moral concern. First of all, embryos at this stage can split into identical twins. Is this a case of one soul splitting into two souls? Embryos at this stage can fuse into a chimera. What has happened to the extra human soul in such a case? This is intellectually indefensible, but it’s morally indefensible given that these notions really are prolonging scarcely endurable misery of tens of millions of human beings, and because of the respect we accord religious faith, we can’t have this dialogue in the way that we should. I submit to you that if you think the interests of a three-day-old blastocyst trump the interests of a little girl with spinal cord injuries or a person with full-body burns, your moral intuitions have been obscured by religious metaphysics.

12.12.10

Opinions are like bellybuttons. Everyone has one and most are full of lint.

Amazon.com readers review classic literature.

Beloved (1987)
Author: Toni Morrison
“Morrison’s obviously a good writer, but truly, her subject matter leaves a LOT to be desired in this book. It’s raunchy beyond belief. People do things with farm animals that they shouldn’t. I couldn’t get through the first two chapters without vomiting. Some things you just shouldn’t put in your head.”

The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927)
Author: Thornton Wilder
“Basically all that happens is five people die on a small bridge and then the author goes on to discuss these people’s lives. What a BORE. Unless you’re some philosophical nerd, you will not enjoy this book at ALL. If I was the author of this book I’d tell myself to get a grip on the real world.”

Catch-22 (1961)
Author: Joseph Heller
“Obviously, a lot people were smoking a lot of weed in the ‘60s to think this thing is worth reading.”

The Catcher in the Rye (1951)
Author: J.D. Salinger
“So many other good books…don’t waste your time on this one. J.D. Salinger went into hiding because he was embarrassed.”

A Clockwork Orange (1963)
Author: Anthony Burgess
“In the first 20 pages, Alex and his lackies beat a guy senseless and rob him; they steal a car and trash it, they get into a vicious gang fight; they attack a couple at their home, destroy the husband’s life work (his book, A Clockwork Orange), beat him and his wife senseless, and rape the wife. This really ticked me off.”

The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967)
Author: William Styron
“My great-great-grandfather is not gay! I don’t know why this William Styron is trying to lie on my great-great-grandfather. Needless to say I am a descendant of Nat Turner and it bothers me that this author is trying to lie to make this book more interesting. I cannot say for certainty that my grandfather was not gay or that he didn’t like white women and neither can this author but I can say that Nat Turner was married and had children and I am a descendant of that union! Other than that idiotic portrayal the book was good.”

Go Tell it on the Mountain (1953)
Author: James Baldwin
“Go tell it on the mountain was an extremely frustrating book. While the themes and some of the events were good (i.e., racism, abuse, religion), the way it was written made the book unenjoyable for me. I found that the way the book was written made it this way for others as well. I don’t think this is just a coincidence. If the book was written differently I probably would have found it enjoyable.”

Gone With the Wind (1936)
Author: Margaret Mitchell
“Well, it’s a girl’s world. The world of Gloria Steinem and the popular feminism, as distilled on TV (including CBC shows, not all fundamentalist Hollywood garbage) of my youth is GONE. Now the girls run the show. You’re not allowed to call them sluts. And it’s impossible to call them virgins. They’re all doing Rhett Butler. So what are they? Idiots… Hope you like the Gangstas. It’s what you deserve.”

The Grapes of Wrath (1939)
Author: John Steinbeck
“While the story did have a great moral to go along with it, it was about dirt! Dirt and migrating. Dirt and migrating and more dirt.”

Gravity’s Rainbow (1973)
Author: Thomas Pynchon
“When one contrasts Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five with this book, it’s like comparing an Olympic sprinter with an obese man running for the bus with a hot dog in one hand and a soda in the other.”

The Great Gatsby (1925)
Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald
“It grieves me deeply that we Americans should take as our classic a book that is no more than a lengthy description of the doings of fops.”

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)
Author: C.S. Lewis
“I bought these books to have something nice to read to my grandkids. I had to stop, however, because the books are nothing more than advertisements for “Turkish Delight,” a candy popular in the U.K. The whole point of buying books for my grandkids was to give them a break from advertising, and here (throughout) are ads for this “Turkish Delight”! How much money is this Mr. Lewis getting from the Cadbury’s chocolate company anyway? This man must be laughing to the bank.”

Lolita (1955)
Author: Vladimir Nabokov
“1) I’m bored. 2) He uses too many allusions to other novels, so that if you’re not well read, this book makes no sense. 3) Most American readers are not fluent in French, so to have conversations or interjections in French with no translation is plain dumb. 4) Did I mention I was bored? 5) As with another reviewer, I agree, he uses a lot of huge words that just slow a person down. And it’s not for theatrics either, it’s just huge words mid-sentence when describing something simple. Nothing in the sense of imagery is gained. 6) Also, to sum it up, it’s a story about a pedophile.”

Lord of the Flies (1955)
Author: William Golding
“I am obsessed with Survivor, so I thought it would be fun. WRONG!!! It is incredibly boring and disgusting. I was very much disturbed when I found young children killing each other. I think that anyone with a conscience would agree with me.”

The Lord of the Rings (1954)
Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
“The book is not readable because of the overuse of adverbs.”

Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
Author: Virginia Woolf
“The only good thing to say about this “literary” drivel is that the person responsible, Virginia Woolf, has been dead for quite some time now. Let us pray to God she stays that way.”

Naked Lunch (1959)
Author: William Burroughs
“I’m a Steely Dan fan so naturally I wanted to read the book they thought compelling enough to name their band after an element of.”

Native Son (1940)
Author: Richard Wright
“Well…someone who murders anyone…out of panic (which is a really stupid, irrational reason) does not deserve any sympathy. I felt the book was mainly about black people hating white people…as usual. Now, tell me anyone…if there was a book about a white person facing discrimination in Africa…or being killed because stones are thrown at them, then everyone would look down on them. Poorly written.”

1984 (1948)
Author: George Orwell
“Don’t listen to anyone who tries to distinguish between “serious” works of literature like this one and allegedly “lesser” novels. The distinction is entirely illusory, because no novels are “better” than any others, and the concept of a “great novel” is an intellectual hoax. This book isn’t as good as Harry Potter in MY opinion, and no one can refute me. Tastes are relative!”

On the Road (1957)
Author: Jack Kerouac
“This book gets my nomination for the most overrated book in American Literature. It is trite, saccharine and false. The themes and insights it contains are not even good enough to be third rate. Moreover, as a prose stylist, Kerouac was probably fourth rate. In short, I despise this piece of [garbage] and would advise all of its hipster doofus fans to lose the tie-dye clothes and throw away their bongs. Maybe then they will read something good for a change.”

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1962)
Author: Ken Kesey
“I guess if you were interested in crazy people this is the book for you.”

Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)
Author: Kurt Vonnegut
“In the novel, they often speak of a planet called Tralfamadore, where he was displayed in a zoo with a former movie star by the name of Montana Wildhack. I thought that the very concept of a man who was kidnapped by aliens was truly unbelievable and a tad ludicrous. I did not find the idea of aliens kidnapping a human and putting them in a zoo very plausible. While some of the Tralfamadorians’ concept of death and living in a moment would be comforting for a war veteran, I found it relatively odd. I do not believe that an alien can kidnap someone and house them in a zoo for years at a time, while it is only a microsecond on earth. I also do not believe that a person has seven parents.”

The Sound and the Fury (1929)
Author: William Faulkner
“This book is like an ungrateful girlfriend. You do your best to understand her and get nothing back in return.”

The Sun Also Rises (1926)
Author: Ernest Hemingway
“Here’s the first half of the book: ‘We had dinner and a few drinks. We went to a cafe and talked and had some drinks. We ate dinner and had a few drinks. Dinner. Drinks. More dinner. More drinks. We took a cab here (or there) in Paris and had some drinks, and maybe we danced and flirted and talked sh*t about somebody. More dinner. More drinks. I love you, I hate you, maybe you should come up to my room, no you can’t’… I flipped through the second half of the book a day or two later and saw the words ‘dinner’ and ‘drinks’ on nearly every page and figured it wasn’t worth the risk.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (1960)
Author: Harper Lee
“I don’t see why this book is so fabulous. I would give it a zero. I find no point in writing a book about segregation, there’s no way of making it into an enjoyable book. And yes I am totally against segregation.”

Tropic of Cancer (1934)
Author: Henry Miller
“This book is one of the worst books I have ever read. I got to about page 3-4.”

28.9.10

What's on the Internet tonight?

You can't be a computer addict and a TV addict at the same time, not unless you start watching TV on your PC. Don't bother to connect your TV tuner card. No TV tuner card is required, when you have something called the Internet. So order your popcorns and settle down for your favourite shows.

http://www.24world.tv/
http://www.alluc.org/
http://www.blinkbox.com/
http://www.bored.com/watchfilms/
http://www.chooseandwatch.com
http://www.coolstreaming.us
http://www.craftytv.com
http://www.dailymotionmusic.com/
http://www.divxcrawler.com/
http://www.divxtube.ca/divx/
http://www.download-tv-now.com/
http://www.freetvonline.com/
http://www.findago.com/series/
http://www.findtvlinks.com/
http://www.flickthat.com/
http://www.free-tv-video-online.info/
http://www.freetvsearch.com/
http://www.greatstufftv.com
http://www.joost.com/
http://www.live-online-tv.com/
http://www.lordoftv.com/
http://www.movienetx.com/
http://www.movierumor.com/
http://www.movies-on-demand.tv/
http://www.onlinemoviestream.tk/
http://www.ovguide.com/
http://www.piggymoo.com/
http://www.rapetheweb.com/cartoons/
http://www.showstash.com/
http://www.siblu.ca/
http://www.sidereel.com

South Park Stream Sites:

http://www.allsp.com/
http://www.stansdad.com/
http://allabout-sp.net/
http://www.southparkx.net/
http://southparkzone.com/


The Simpsons Stream Sites:

http://simpsonseps.com/

http://www.simpsonsfree.com

Family Guy Stream Sites:

http://www.familyguyx.net/
http://www.familyparkworld.com/

Prison Break Stream Sites:

http://www.prisonbreakcrazy.com
http://www.prisonbreakaddict.com


Lost Stream Site:

http://www.viewlost.com/


Heroes Stream Site:

http://www.heroescrazy.com/

Horror Movies

http://www.asian-horror-movies.com - Awesome site!


Cartoon Network:

http://cnonline.iifree.net/


Wrestling Stream Sites:

http://www.evolutionwrestling.piczo.com/
http://www.dailymotion.com/
http://hardcoretv.info/cat/37.html

Newly Added :

http://love4anime.com/
http://tvunetworks.com/
http://www.tv-links.eu/
http://webtvandvideo.com/
http://tvlinksdb.com/
http://www.movievix.com/
http://www.ninjavideo.net/
http://www.craxtv.com/
http://video247.tv/
http://www.greatonlinetv.com/
http://www.80millionmoviesfree.com/
http://www.moviedownloadmatrix.com/
http://www.phim88.com/
http://www.bbpctv.com/
http://www.movies-tube.net/
http://www.globe-movies.com/
http://www.now-movies.com/
http://www.familyparkworld.com/
http://www.inner-live.com/


26.9.10

Spam that makes you go...huh?

Usually about twice a week I get spam from people with unusual names like Marybelle Stefanic and Nina Sauppo with the subject line that always reads GetSoftwareYouNeed.GreatDiscounts. The other day, just out of boredom I opened one of the emails up, to see why it wasn't going in with my other junk mail. It turns out that the actual sender of the email was astriddianaschouten@hotmail.com. I checked the other one and it was from thatannegirl@hotmail.com. In the body of both was the same line of text about how I could be getting software for cheap by visiting http://www.hereinover.com. Nothing terribly unusual about that, right? The thing is that at the bottom of each email, after the message (which, by the way, is written in terribly broken English by someone with who has a foreign native language) there's always an unusual block/paragraph of text. I should be but I find myself intrigued by this text. Here are two examples:

ground, partly supported on the knee and arm of Friedel, who sat with The insistent whim seized him, as he still bent thus face, the lively Adeline left the mother and daughter alone. the meeting look at one another in injured surprise, and before the his purpose. Through all his resentment and bitterness of heart, he Our master of hounds shall be a country gentleman who takes a met another Indian, and Mr. Eddy, now conscious that his feet were I shall dream of the sword held fast This kind of business was new to us, and we liked it very well for had some special interest in inquiring after your father, and,

--and--

ber See gehen solle. Dieser wackere hand, if there was a candidate so eminent that his return could be di buon proponimento per udire Or ride secure the cruel sky, Wellesley alumnae, helped by graduates of Harvard, Cornell, the hostile bands that, without any provocation whatever, had enemies, may carry the glory of her arms to the banks of the Thames,


They appear to be lines of text lifted from a variety of different sources and for the most part are gibberish. Yet, if you look at them for a while (especially the first one) they start looking like they were composed with a certain amount of intent rather than just willy-nilly. I'm actually starting to regret trashing all the earlier emails and find myself looking forward to future arrivals. Color me strange.

24.9.10

Take a look around the corner and see what's coming...IT'S HALLOWEEN!!

And there's no better time to get familiar with the works of John Kenn. Here are a few examples of his work, but you can find a whole bunch more at: http://johnkenn.blogspot.com/






19.9.10

Everything you need to know is on YouTube. Well. almost.

How to print your own T-shirt: http://bit.ly/159Hpi
How to speed read:
http://bit.ly/2FRRi
How to look like @
ladygaga: http://bit.ly/Rb9pv
How to tie a tie:
http://bit.ly/JXHZo
How to make fresh pasta:
http://bit.ly/TeKAS
How to make fire without matches or a lighter:
http://bit.ly/pSyZw
How to open a beer with a pen:
http://bit.ly/2usCi1
How to knit:
http://bit.ly/16oQBg
How to cut your own bangs:
http://bit.ly/Ib3pq
How to make ice cream in a bag (preschool edition):
http://bit.ly/X8s65
How to do a banana kick:
http://bit.ly/1JJT0f
How to count to 20 in Japanese:
http://bit.ly/4gCv3q
How to peel a melon:
http://bit.ly/BmXlB
How to get better mileage:
http://bit.ly/2zdzm
How to create perfect red lips:
http://bit.ly/15sezH
How to escape from handcuffs:
http://bit.ly/jHQPr
How to flirt like a pro:
http://bit.ly/2Rv5Zm
How to surf:
http://bit.ly/Ga8Dk
How to train your dog to stay:
http://bit.ly/xJWUb
How to make a bacon-infused cocktail:
http://bit.ly/mameg
How to build your self confidence:
http://bit.ly/dwZpZ
How to beat writer's block:
http://bit.ly/3x5kek
How to be funny on a first date:
http://bit.ly/m8Dvx
How to be a DJ:
http://bit.ly/cfEj4
How to make mac & cheese, mmm:
http://bit.ly/Ov8tC
How to use gel liner:
http://bit.ly/TrMRD
How to give a presentation:
http://bit.ly/12ny4U
How to make a how to video:
http://bit.ly/6SKe8
How to do the Windmill:
http://bit.ly/RdWO9
How to get watermelon nails:
http://bit.ly/czp8n
How to shoot penalty kicks:
http://bit.ly/5qREA
How to wrap a gift professionally:
http://bit.ly/LhEpU
How to make your own bicycle crank:
http://bit.ly/10fe45
How to make chicken biryani:
http://bit.ly/4hqV9R
How to make wine:
http://bit.ly/tdafs
How to draw a "realistic" manga face:
http://bit.ly/108hUx
How to understand integrals:
http://bit.ly/Bzc6B
How to look sharp for a job interview:
http://bit.ly/hksI0
How to play violin - lesson one:
http://bit.ly/2DnJDh
How to properly chop vegetables:
http://bit.ly/1dq9I4
How to make a camisole in one minute:
http://bit.ly/rLNCx
How to grow strawberries indoors:
http://bit.ly/Mo5bz
How to shave:
http://bit.ly/3kv7IE
How to crack a coconut:
http://bit.ly/3XTfvw
How to buy a house:
http://bit.ly/RSVng
How to make Rigatoni Carbonara:
http://bit.ly/MsK57
How to make a BristleBot:
http://bit.ly/unPlZ
How to do makeup for small eyes:
http://bit.ly/1McfOw
How to make a custom beer pong table:
http://bit.ly/1D5n2i
How to fuse plastic grocery bags into a reusable shopping bag:
http://bit.ly/1eS6zf
How to fold a fitted sheet:
http://bit.ly/4kxbJI
How to save money:
http://bit.ly/3sd0u6
How to improve your memory:
http://bit.ly/eCILa
How to sew a dress:
http://bit.ly/13xkKx
How to backflip:
http://bit.ly/1Awqto
How to curl hair:
http://bit.ly/WpwdS
How to recycle beer bottles with limes:
http://bit.ly/1z8yM8
How to hem pants:
http://bit.ly/k7sW3
How to make a green screen:
http://bit.ly/pPtJW
How to polish shoes:
http://bit.ly/45dXNu
How to repair a bicycle puncture:
http://bit.ly/ocqzX
How to make kimchi:
http://bit.ly/3kFvLs
How to recycle used computers
http://bit.ly/3SkN6a
How to make veggie sushi:
http://bit.ly/oE6tZ
How to record better webcam videos:
http://bit.ly/2rbn5E
How to speak French - meeting and greeting:
http://bit.ly/OTfiU
How to make a "Where the Wild Things Are" Halloween costume:
http://bit.ly/28qjv1
How to do yoga:
http://bit.ly/1cGeeW
How to cook Cola BBQ pork chops:
http://bit.ly/3eWonX
How to deliver a baby in an emergency:
http://bit.ly/469fc5
How to melt away pounds:
http://bit.ly/2BW8BE
How to wear different types of scarves:
http://bit.ly/2sGH8s
How to Casper:
http://bit.ly/1WwYHI
How to fold origami:
http://bit.ly/1Q9T84
How to do self-defense when confronted with a gun:
http://bit.ly/2l47Fz
How to make a camisole in one minute:
http://bit.ly/rLNCx
How to make ramen noodles:
http://bit.ly/16JKhC
How to care for a pet shark:
http://bit.ly/1is544
How to apply fake eyelashes:
http://bit.ly/2AvRV3
How to make a card:
http://bit.ly/2M8YaO
How to make simple, delicious compound butters:
http://bit.ly/Q2USo
How to dye your clothes:
http://bit.ly/4nkbEZ
How to transform a boring school uniform:
http://bit.ly/49P2I5
How to plant a vegetable garden in 30 minutes:
http://bit.ly/1qdPEn
How to solder copper pipe:
http://bit.ly/3Fsit2
How to make an upholstered headboard:
http://bit.ly/iCh9a
How to dress appropriately (according to Tim Gunn):
http://bit.ly/2Jjiux
How to make sage risotto (as taught by a kid):
http://bit.ly/27jyEd

16.9.10

For all you word lovers out there...

1. A bicycle can't stand alone; it is two tired.

2. A will is a dead giveaway.

3. Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.

4. A backward poet writes inverse.

5. In a democracy it's your vote that counts; in feudalism, it's your Count that votes.

6. A chicken crossing the road: poultry in motion.

7. If you don't pay your exorcist you can get repossessed.

8. With her marriage she got a new name and a dress.

9. Show me a piano falling down a mine shaft and I'll show you A-flat miner.

10. When a clock is hungry it goes back four seconds.

11. The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine was fully recovered.

12. A grenade fell onto a kitchen floor in France resulted in Linoleum Blownapart.

13. You are stuck with your debt if you can't budge it.

14. Local Area Network in Australia : The LAN down under.

15. He broke into song because he couldn't find the key.

16. A calendar's days are numbered.

17. A lot of money is tainted: 'Taint yours, and 'taint mine.

18. A boiled egg is hard to beat.

19. He had a photographic memory which was never developed.

20. A plateau is a high form of flattery.

21. The short fortuneteller who escaped from prison: a small medium at large.

22. Those who get too big for their britches will be exposed in the end.

23. When you've seen one shopping center you've seen a mall.

24. If you jump off a Paris bridge, you are in Seine.

25. When she saw her first strands of gray hair, she thought she'd dye.

26. Bakers trade bread recipes on a knead to know basis.

27. Santa's helpers are subordinate clauses.

28. Acupuncture: a jab well done.

29. Marathon runners with bad shoes suffer the agony of de feet.

30. The roundest knight at king Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference. He acquired his size from too much pi.

31. I thought I saw an eye doctor on an Alaskan island, but it turned out to be an optical Aleutian.

32. She was only a whisky maker, but he loved her still.

33. A rubber band pistol was confiscated from algebra class because it was a weapon of math disruption.

34. The butcher backed into the meat grinder and got a little behind in his work.

35. No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

36. A dog gave birth to puppies near the road and was cited for littering.

37. Two silk worms had a race. They ended up in a tie.

38. A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it.

39. Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

40. Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other, 'You stay here, I'll go on a head.'

41. I wondered why the baseball kept getting bigger. Then it hit me.

42. A sign on the lawn at a drug rehab center said: 'Keep off the Grass.'

43. A small boy swallowed some coins and was taken to a hospital. When his grandmother telephoned to ask how he was, a nurse said, 'No change yet.'

44. The soldier who survived mustard gas and pepper spray is now a seasoned veteran.

45. When cannibals ate a missionary, they got a taste of religion.

46. Don't join dangerous cults: Practice safe sects.

How to write good!


  1. Avoid alliteration. Always.
  2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
  3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They're old hat.)
  4. Employ the vernacular.
  5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.
  6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.
  7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.
  8. Contractions aren't necessary.
  9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.
  10. One should never generalize.
  11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said: "I hate quotations. Tell me what you know."
  12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.
  13. Don't be redundant; don't use more words than necessary; it's highly superfluous.
  14. Profanity sucks.
  15. Be more or less specific.
  16. Understatement is always best.
  17. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.
  18. One-word sentences? Eliminate.
  19. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.
  20. The passive voice is to be avoided.
  21. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.
  22. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.
  23. Who needs rhetorical questions?

Neil Gaiman on writing.

1 Write.

2 Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.

3 Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.

4 Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.

5 Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.

6 Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.

7 Laugh at your own jokes.

8 The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

There's a word for that, right?

The New York Times 50 Fancy Words (defined and used)

1. Inchoate: just begun and so not fully formed or developed; I am glad your inchoate proposals for integrating the company were not accepted this time, thus saving us face.

2. Profligacy: recklessly wasteful; wildly extravagant, profligate behavior; Anderson’s profligacy cost him his job and its better you tighten up your belt before you go the same way.

3. Sui Generis: being the only example of its kind, unique; Mr. Bill Tandy generated his sui generis theory based on little research and more hypothesis, thus finding no takers for his pet project.

4. Austerity: severe and morally strict; the quality of being austere, having no pleasures or comforts; Every major war on this planet were followed by many years of austerity.

5. Profligate: using money, resources, etc., in a way that wastes them; The firm’s profligate spending only hastened its downfall.

6. Baldenfreude: Satisfaction derived from the misfortune of bald or balding individuals (coined by NYT columnist Maureen Dowd); Humpty Dumpty’s antics remain a constant source of baldenfreude for children and adults alike.

7. Opprobrium: harsh criticism, contempt; His ludicrous attempts at mimicry in the office only earned him the opprobrium of his colleagues.

8. Apostates: pl; a person who abandons a belief or principle; The millionaire technocrat and his cronies were publicly derided for being apostates, after they were exposed of polluting the environment while purporting to have spent large sums for water conservation.

9. Solipsistic: the theory that the self is all that can be known to exist; His solipsistic view about life ensured that he lived in social isolation.

10. Obduracy: refusing to change in any way; Anthony’s obduracy in his legal case expedited his impeachment.

11. Internecine: causing destruction to both sides; The African states’ internecine conflict continues to extract a terrible toll on innocent human lives.

12. Soporific: adj; causing sleep; The soporific drug caused Tony to fall asleep in the board meeting.

13. Kristallnacht: German, night of (broken) glass : Kristall, crystal (from Middle High German, from Old High German cristalla, from Latin crystallus, crystallum; see crystal) + Nacht, night (from Middle High German naht, from Old High German; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots); The Kristallnacht remains an infamous event in the German history.

14. Peripatetic: going from place to place; The peripatetic bards of yore propagated the words of the Holy Prophet.

15. Nascent: beginning to exist, not fully developed; In its initial stage, the nascent film industry faced harsh opposition from moral groups.

16. Desultory: going from one thing to another, without a definite plan or purpose; Garcia’s desultory conversation got everybody yawning.

17. Redoubtable: deserving to be feared and respected; Mike’s redoubtable instincts as a prize-fighter kept his opponents at arm’s distance.

18. Hubris: excessive pride; The Empire’s vanity and hubris in its exaggerated military were the reason for its downfall.

19. Mirabile Dictu: wonderful to relate; Randy’s winning putt remained mirabile dictu in the golf club gossip for many years.

20. Crèches: a place where babies are looked after while their parents work, shop, etc.; Go down the Green Avenue and you will find a string of crèches and day-care centres.

21. Apoplectic: sudden loss of the ability to feel or move; adj: suffering from apoplexy; easily made angry; His son’s antics on the playground left him apoplectic with rage.

22. Overhaul: to examine carefully and thoroughly and make any necessary changes or repairs; to come from behind and pass them; Michael’s faster car easily overhauled the leading drivers in the F1 championship.

23. Ersatz: used as a poor-quality substitute for something else, inferior to an original item; The DJ’s ersatz musical numbers were a poor rendition of Celina’s work.

24. Obstreperous: very noisy or difficult to control; Andy’s obstreperous behavior just after a few drinks generally caused his early exit from most parties.

25. Jejune: too simple, naïve; dull, lacking nourishment; Horrified by the senator’s jejune responses to their problems, the voters guild decided to withdraw their support to him in the forthcoming elections.

26. Omertà: rule or code that prohibits speaking or revealing information, generally relates to activities of organized crime; sub; the Mafia; Henry was vowed to the code of Omertà and sealed his lips during the police interrogation.

27. Putative: generally supposed to be the thing specified; Mr Brown is referred to as the putative father in the document.

28. Manichean: A believer in Manichaeism – an ancient Iranian Gnostic religion; Roberta’s Manichean beliefs found little approval in the stoic theology group discussion.

29. Canard: a false report or rumour, aerofoil designs on certain airplanes; The disturbing canard about my company’s finances left me in despair.

30. Ubiquitous: seeming to be everywhere or in several places at the same time; The ubiquitous internet is both a blessing, as well as, a curse.

31. Atavistic: relating to the behavior of one’s ancestors in the distant past; The chieftain urged his tribe to curb their atavistic urges and refrain from unnecessary violence.

32. Renminbi: another name for the Chinese Yuan, official currency of People’s Republic of China; Chinese renmin people + bi currency; Around 1950, the Chinese government officially released the Renminbi notes for circulation.

33. Sanguine: hopeful, optimistic; She remained sanguine about our chances of success in the raffle draw.

34. Antediluvian: very old-fashioned; His antediluvian ideas are preposterous!

35. Cynosure: object or someone who serves as a focal point of attention and admiration, something that serves to guide; His wife, Catherine, remained the cynosure of all eyes throughout the evening gala.

36. Alacrity: eagerness or enthusiasm; Richard accepted her offer of marriage with alacrity.

37. Epistemic: cognitive, relating to learning, or involving knowledge; The monk’s epistemic dissertation was an engaging study of New Testament beliefs.

38. Egregious: exceptional, outstanding; The NBA referee’s decision was the most egregious error of judgment.

39. Incendiary: designed to set something on fire, tending to create public disturbances or violence; Amanda’s incendiary remarks alienated her from the whole campus.

40. Chimera: an imaginary creäture composed of the parts of several different animals, wild or impossible idea; Harry gazed awestruck at the monstrous chimera, a gigantic beast with the head of a lion and the body of a winged horse.

41. Laconic: using few words; Jerry’s laconic sense of humor endeared him to the crowd.

42. Polemicist: person skilled in art of writing or speech, arguing cases forcefully; Mr. Trimble stands little chance in the public debate against the Republican polemicist candidate, Mr. Burns.

43. Comity: mutual civility; amity, an atmosphere of social harmony, the policy whereby one religious sect refrains from proselytizing the members of another sect; The Shias and Sunnis lived in perfect comity in their remote mountain hamlet.

44. Provenance: the place that something originally came from; He deals in antique furniture of doubtful provenance.

45. Sclerotic: condition in which soft tissue in the body becomes abnormally hard; Doctors were at a loss in explaining the child’s unusual sclerotic condition.

46. Prescient: knowing or appearing to know about things before they happen; His prescient instincts saved him a small fortune when he sold his shares before the stock market crash.

47. Hegemony: control and leadership, by one country over others; The United States’ military hegemony in the region was a source of great distress to Iqbal.

48. Verisimilitude: the appearance of being true or real; To add verisimilitude to the play, the stage is covered with snow for the winter scene.

49. Feckless: not able to manage things properly or look after oneself, not responsible enough; The McCarthy’s are feckless parents with more children than they could support.

50. Demarche: step or manoeuvre in political or diplomatic affairs; Thierry’s political demarche with the liberals saved the government a great deal of face in the senate hearings.